SCLT and Local News

Sitka Land Trust Gets $234,000 Grant. An affordable housing project at the Old City Shops land on Halibut Point Road is moving forward, thanks to a $234,000 grant from the Rasmuson Foundation.
The funds will help set the stage for the first phase of the project to build six houses on the vacant tract at 1306 Halibut Point Road, Community Land Trust President Randy Hughey said.  more (PDF file) or go to http://sitkasentinel.com/7/2012-05-10-22-08-10/local-news/10186-sitka-land-trust-gets-234-000-grant

Multiple-Unit Project Next for Land Trust As the Sitka Community Land Trust makes plans to break ground on a multiple-unit housing project, it’s still seeking a buyer for the first home it has built.

Land Trust president Randy Hughey spoke at the Chamber of Commerce, Wednesday about the newest project at the Old City Shops land on Halibut Point Road, and the groups’ first home on Lillian Drive. Read the PDF or read at the Sentinel.

Rasmuson grant boosts Sitka’s affordable cottage plan An affordable cottage neighborhood on Halibut Point Road in Sitka took another step toward reality, with the help of almost a quarter-of-a-million dollars in grant funding.

Listen to the story:

http://kcaw-org.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/01SCLT.mp3

Sitka Land Trust Gets $234,000 Grant. An affordable housing project at the Old City Shops land on Halibut Point Road is moving forward, thanks to a $234,000 grant from the Rasmuson Foundation.
The funds will help set the stage for the first phase of the project to build six houses on the vacant tract at 1306 Halibut Point Road, Community Land Trust President Randy Hughey said.  more (PDF file) or go to the Sentinel's website.



  • Community Presentation: This is a video of our Old City Shops Affordable Cottage Community Slide Presentation.


  • Assembly Advances Affordable Housing "The Assembly took its first step Tuesday night [11-10-15] toward creating a six-home affordable housing project on the old city shops property. The vote was 6-0 to approve an ordinance selling the plot at 1306 Halibut Point Road to Sitka Community Development Corporation for $1. The ordinance states that all this, and the other two parcels, 1410 and 1414 HPR, will be dedicated to affordable housing." more
  • Annual Report: The SCDC 2014 Annual Report is available.
  • SCDC is an IGNITE! Community Pitch Fest Award winner

SCDC was recently one of 6 CLTs featured at the National CLT Network Conference in Lexington, KY. SCDC "walked away with $500 and the bragging rights of being a nationally recognized program for innovation and impact." Here's the story.See the story below for more details.
  • As a result of the KCAW report going national (see below), the Sitka CLT affordable cottage neighborhood design was noticed by the National Community Land Trust Network (NCLTN) staff, and now SCDC has been chosen to present its Old City Shops affordable cottage neighborhood design at the NCLTN's first annual IGNITE! Community Pitch Fest! This is the description of the project: "With a scarcity of privately owned land available for housing of any kind, Sitka Community Development Corporation is repurposing a parcel of municipal land into an affordable cottage neighborhood for 13 families. Already, the Rasmuson Foundation is thinking that Sitka CDC’s cottage neighborhood could be a replicable idea for other Alaskan communities."
  • The latest Sitka CLT housing plan has gone national! KCAW's report was picked up by the national “Housing Matters” newsletter published by the Urban Land Institute and the MacArthur Foundation: COTTAGE NEIGHBORHOOD OFFERS WALKABILITY AND AFFORDABILITY.
  • Board Member Joshua Houston thanks the public on KCAW.
  • Playhouse Raffle. The Sitka Community Development Corporation (SCDC) sold raffle tickets for a playhouse this fall and are pleased to announce that William E Davis and Nancy Yaw Davis have won the SCDC playhouse! The money received will be used to continue the support of the Sitka Community Land Trust Program for permanently affordable housing. playhouse raffleThanks to everyone who purchased tickets and James Poulson and Mark Guillory for making the playhouse. Thanks also to Kathy Dumag, manager at Spenard Builders Supply - SITKA, and Judi Lehman, for materials, and Arrowhead Press for printing the tickets. Thanks to The Greater Sitka Chamber of Commerce for letting us do this raffle using their state permit. Thanks to KCAW for public service announcements, and to Buzz Brown for the lengthy loan of his trailer. Thanks to Sea Mart Quality Foods for letting us sell tickets there. And thanks for all the great conversations at Sea Mart, the Sitka Counseling Christmas Bazaar and the Sitka Artisans Market, and for your support for the Community Land Trust Program.
  • CLT Land: City and Borough of Sitka Assembly gives land to Sitka Community Land Trust! Sentineland KCAW
  • Affordable Housing Support.
    Roger Hames, CEO of Hames Corp., right, presents a $5,000 check to the Sitka Community Development Corporation Executive Director Mim McConnell and Sea Mart donationBoard President Randy Hughey to help create affordable housing in Sitka, through a Community Land Trust. The money was a "challenge grant" that SCDC received after a matching $5,000 was raised; Rich Riggs of Silver Bay Seafood, Duke and Mae Dunsing, Mike Venneberg, Bonnie Brenner and Gary Smith of Schmolck Mechanical collectively donated the matching $5,000.

CLT work12/18-19, 2012, SCDC hosted a Community Land Trust (CLT) consultant in Sitka. Michael Brown (photo, right) of Burlington Associates in Community Development, LLC generously donated some of his vacation time while visiting a daughter in Juneau to make a number of presentations about CLTs and meet with various city officials and the SCDC board of directors. This is theDaily Sitka Sentinel News article covering the presentation to the Assembly and the SCDC Directors. Mim McConnell and Brown visited KCAW for a morning interview with Robert Woosley, KCAW News Director.

The KCAW Morning Interview: SCDC explores building materials reuse facility, community land trusts December 15, 2011 Listen/Read off site...

Funding Affordable Housing

There are virtually no negative policy implications to providing funding for affordable housing. Here are some bullet points from a  Center for Housing Policy brief. Affordable housing policies:
  1. Create jobs: Investing in the development of affordable housing creates a significant number of construction-related jobs, and new residents support additional jobs in other sectors going forward.
  2. Attract both employers and employees. Surveys and supporting research show that both employers and workers understand the importance of affordable housing in attracting and retaining a skilled workforce.
  3. Increase consumer spending. Building affordable housing increases the buying power of both those involved in its construction and those who occupy it afterward.
  4. Increase government revenues. The taxes and fees associated with the development of affordable housing – both during the construction and after the homes are occupied – can represent significant revenue for state and local governments.
  5. Lower the risk of foreclosure. Affordable homeownership programs appear to produce a more sustainable path to homeownership, eliminating a number of significant foreclosure-related costs that municipalities would otherwise have to absorb.

Let's End Homelessness Now - Watch and Find Out How:

 

Please take a moment to check out how the United for Homes proposal would affect your taxes.

 

News

  • YIMBY There is a new, open wiki for YIMBY (Yes In My Backyard) & housing issues. Anyone can start a new page or edit articles on topics related to creating more inclusive, affordable, equitable housing and communities. Here's the link: http://yimby.wiki/wiki/Main_Page
  • The Juneau Housing First project will create 44 permanent supportive housing units that targets Juneau's highly vulnerable chronic homeless population who are chemically dependent and exhibit an extensive history of emergency service utilization. Many of these individuals have co-occurring disorders (substance abuse & mental health disorders). The project will provide safe and secure housing to residents in order to facilitate dignified lives, a healthy community, and will provide significant cost savings to the community. (July 2016)
  • Housing commission proposes accessory apartment incentive Program aims to put more small units on the market. September 4, 2013.
    By KATIE MORITZ, Juneau Empire
  • "Why childless households will lead the market" from Better! Cities & Towns
  • HB 50 passed legislature: makes communities and AHFC Housing more vibrant, more available: News Release
  • Learn how Sequestration affects housing programs: 
    HUDBG cuts under sequestration
     
    HUDRA cuts under sequestration
  • "Why childless households will lead the market" from Better! Cities & Towns
  • New Smartphone Application: Fair Market Rents & Income Limits from HUD’s Policy Develop: Google Play
  • Share Common Ground: More boomers are opting for smaller neighborhoods with a bigger sense of community by: Sally Abrahms | from: AARP Bulletin | May 7, 2012
  • Pocket Neighborhood Slideshow
    Boomers can downsize without losing the amenities of suburban living
    from: AARP Bulletin | May 3, 2012
  • Cohousing in Anchorage. Could our CLT look something like this? Anchorage Daily News article.
  • Alaska rates poorly on extent of child homelessness. STUDY: State 47th in country in percentage of kids affected. more off site...
  • Census shows 1 in 2 people are poor or low-income By HOPE YEN Associated Press December 16, 2011 more off site...
  • Poorest poor in US hits new record: 1 in 15 people "The ranks of America's poorest poor have climbed to a record high — 1 in 15 people — spread widely across metropolitan areas as the housing bust pushed many inner-city poor into suburbs and other outlying places and shriveled jobs and income." Nov. 4, 2011 more off site...

Affordable Housing News

  • Enterprise and JCHS Project Renter Burdens in 2025 This is relevant reading for Sitka since we also have a high rate of renter burdens. This article is focused on 'severely' rent burdened, meaning they are paying more than half their income in rent. A 5-yr average ('09-'13) of Sitka's cost-burdened households (paying more than 30% of their household income for rent) is 49.6%.

    "Overall, these projections lead to the sobering conclusion that severe renter burdens are likely to worsen over the next 10 years, particularly for older people, non-white households, married couples and single people. As it is, only about one in four income eligible households receive housing assistance today. Our projections indicate that this share will only get lower if more isn’t done to meet this burgeoning need. Given these findings, it is critical for policymakers at all levels of government to prioritize the preservation of existing affordable housing and expand supports for additional housing assistance to keep up with the need that is likely to continue to grow."